Newsletter

There goes another month of restrictions and now some indications that we may be able to relax a bit more, but certainly no time for complacency, especially for our age group.

Newcastle City Council has waived Community Centre fees for missed meetings and they have now advised details of conditions to be applied when the centre finally opens. As yet no firm date has been set.

The main conditions are:

  • Maximum 36 people in room with social distancing,
  • no admission outside of booked hours,
  • hirers to supply own sanitisation station,
  • hirers to clean and sanitise tables, chairs, door handles after meeting,
  • register to include contact details of all attendees, and
  • separate specific conditions should use of the kitchen be allowed.

Bela Sido will call in to see the manager at Maryland for a more personal opinion on expected opening etc.

Another online Zoom meeting hosted by Brendon and Margaret Young was held on 9th June and it is obvious that we are feeling more comfortable with this method of keeping in touch. We ask that more members join, if only to listen in, and Arek Daniel has offered help with technical issues if required.

Donation from Ravensworth.

Transperineal Biopsies at Maitland Hospital are still our number one option. This depends on the Head of Urology being able to negotiate a satisfactory outcome with HNE Health and Maitland Hospital, a slow and complicated process.

Thanks go to Tracy Scott who has been trying very hard to push this forward.

Gary Herrett, Jim Lloyd and myself are hoping for a face to face meeting at Ravensworth in early July.

Cheers for now

Mike Seddon

Acting Treasurer

______________________________________________________________________________

Hello all,

As Mike has mentioned above, another Zoom meeting was held on 9th June. This was our most successful Zoom meeting yet with 10 attendees, who all managed to hook into the meeting with success. The meeting went for around 1 hour on this occasion. I think I speak for all who agreed how useful this meeting was. We discussed options and strategies surrounding the Ravensworth donation in particular and it was good to get some feedback from those present.

If you would like to join in the next Zoom meeting, please don’t feel intimidated by the technology. A computer with internet access, a camera and a speaker attached, is all that you need. Zoom will step through a test of your equipment. Have a look at a couple of tutorials on the Zoom website to see it in action.

If you have any HPCSG friends without a computer, perhaps you can meet and both join in. Further details on our next Zoom meeting are held within this newsletter. Remember, 14th July at 2pm. Join in!

Our face to face meetings aren’t too far away now, all things going well with COVID. The committee is however mindful of the health of our group, and will delay the face to face meetings in the best interest of the group.

While speaking of the committee, I am sure there are members reading this newsletter who have skills and interests that can value-add to our committee and group as a whole. Have you chaired meetings before? Perhaps you are skilled in bookkeeping or event management? Do you love public speaking perhaps? All of these skills and more could be utilized by the HPCSG to improve the support we provide to the men and their families in the Hunter who are affected by their prostate health.

The committee would be pleased to accept expressions of interest from any members past or present, who would like to join the committee in any capacity and assist with the planning and running of the group. Your talents and strengths can be tailored to suit any role you may like to consider. Additional cleaning duties are also now required due to COVID -19. Feel free to give Mike or Brendon a call with your expressions of interest.

Topic: Zoom HPCSG meeting

Time: Jul 14, 2020 02:00 PM Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney

Join Zoom Meeting

Test improves prostate cancer detection

Tuesday, 16 June, 2020

Hospital Health

Australian researchers have found that a groundbreaking test can improve the early detection of prostate cancer.

Published in the open access journal Frontiers in Oncology , the research findings reveal that the ISET-Circulating Tumour Cells (CTC) Test can markedly improve detection of prostate cancer compared with the existing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test.

The ISET-CTC Test is used to identify abnormal cells circulating in the blood from any origin. Monitoring the presence of CTC cells may help with the early detection of cancer. Generally, the higher the CTC count, the higher the risk of cancer.

Researchers from the National Institute of Integrative Medicine (NIIM) used the cytology-based ISET-CTC Test plus PSA marker test to evaluate the risk of developing prostate cancer in a group of Australian men.

The research findings suggest that the combination of ISET-CTC testing and PSA marker testing has an estimated positive -predictive-value (PPV) of 99% and negative-predictive-value (NPV) of 97%. This means there is a greater certainty about diagnosis than the standard PSA blood test, which provides a PPV of approximately 25% and an NPV of 15.5%.

Prostate cancer is most common in men and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths (25%) in Australia. One in seven Australian men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer by the age of 85, with more than 3300 men dying each year. This number is rising, suggesting the need for a more reliable and accurate way to diagnose the disease.

Further reading:

https://www.hospitalhealth.com.au/content/clinical-services/news/test-improves-prostate-cancer-detection-1324228899?fbclid=IwAR3OWNVa-dW8gT1L6pi4n36igLq3EVSBw2ZAb65pqaV5AFiaww_vkzA-tlE#axzz6Pb2nShh2

COVID-19 Global Men’s Health update

Glen Poole

Australian Mens Health Forum

Global Action for Men’s Health (GAMH) have provided an international update on some of the links between coronavirus (COVID-19) and gender in their latest news bulletin.

Last month, GAMH reported evidence from China suggesting that mortality rates from COVID- 19 in men were almost twice as high as in women. The proportion of male deaths from the virus in Italy has been even higher: of the 827 deaths recorded by 11 March, 80% were male.

This pattern, if confirmed over a longer time period, would be consistent with what epidemiologists observed during the SARS and MERS outbreaks. In the 2003 SARS outbreak in Hong Kong, for instance, nearly 22% of infected men died, compared to around 13% of women. In an analysis of MERS infections between 2017 and 2018, around 32% of men died, and nearly 26% of women.

The mortality ‘gap’ could be caused by sex-based immunological or gendered differences, such as patterns and prevalence of smoking. The sex disparity also holds true in SARS -infected mice and it may be that the hormone oestrogen has a protective effect: removing the ovaries of infected female mice or blocking the oestrogen receptor makes the animals more likely to die compared to infected control mice.

Further reading:

https://www.amhf.org.au/covid_19_global_men_s_health_update

Test improves prostate cancer detection

Tuesday, 16 June, 2020

Hospital Health

Australian researchers have found that a groundbreaking test can improve the early detection of prostate cancer.

Published in the open access journal Frontiers in Oncology , the research findings reveal that the ISET-Circulating Tumour Cells (CTC) Test can markedly improve detection of prostate cancer compared with the existing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test.

The ISET-CTC Test is used to identify abnormal cells circulating in the blood from any origin. Monitoring the presence of CTC cells may help with the early detection of cancer. Generally, the higher the CTC count, the higher the risk of cancer.

Researchers from the National Institute of Integrative Medicine (NIIM) used the cytology-based ISET-CTC Test plus PSA marker test to evaluate the risk of developing prostate cancer in a group of Australian men.

The research findings suggest that the combination of ISET-CTC testing and PSA marker testing has an estimated positive -predictive-value (PPV) of 99% and negative-predictive-value (NPV) of 97%. This means there is a greater certainty about diagnosis than the standard PSA blood test, which provides a PPV of approximately 25% and an NPV of 15.5%.

Prostate cancer is most common in men and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths (25%) in Australia. One in seven Australian men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer by the age of 85, with more than 3300 men dying each year. This number is rising, suggesting the need for a more reliable and accurate way to diagnose the disease.

Further reading:

https://www.hospitalhealth.com.au/content/clinical-services/news/test-improves-prostate-cancer-detection-1324228899?fbclid=IwAR3OWNVa-dW8gT1L6pi4n36igLq3EVSBw2ZAb65pqaV5AFiaww_vkzA-tlE#axzz6Pb2nShh2

COVID-19 Global Men’s Health update

Glen Poole

Australian Mens Health Forum

Global Action for Men’s Health (GAMH) have provided an international update on some of the links between coronavirus (COVID-19) and gender in their latest news bulletin.

Last month, GAMH reported evidence from China suggesting that mortality rates from COVID- 19 in men were almost twice as high as in women. The proportion of male deaths from the virus in Italy has been even higher: of the 827 deaths recorded by 11 March, 80% were male.

This pattern, if confirmed over a longer time period, would be consistent with what epidemiologists observed during the SARS and MERS outbreaks. In the 2003 SARS outbreak in Hong Kong, for instance, nearly 22% of infected men died, compared to around 13% of women. In an analysis of MERS infections between 2017 and 2018, around 32% of men died, and nearly 26% of women.

The mortality ‘gap’ could be caused by sex-based immunological or gendered differences, such as patterns and prevalence of smoking. The sex disparity also holds true in SARS -infected mice and it may be that the hormone oestrogen has a protective effect: removing the ovaries of infected female mice or blocking the oestrogen receptor makes the animals more likely to die compared to infected control mice.

Further reading:

https://www.amhf.org.au/covid_19_global_men_s_health_update

GpON2xiTE95bWgzdz09

Meeting ID: 830 4049 1694

Password: HPCSG

Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kbkQs97cjW

Brendon Young

HPCSG newsletter editor

0437 403 651

__________

Test improves prostate cancer detection

Tuesday, 16 June, 2020

Hospital Health

Australian researchers have found that a groundbreaking test can improve the early detection of prostate cancer.

Published in the open access journal Frontiers in Oncology , the research findings reveal that the ISET-Circulating Tumour Cells (CTC) Test can markedly improve detection of prostate cancer compared with the existing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test.

The ISET-CTC Test is used to identify abnormal cells circulating in the blood from any origin. Monitoring the presence of CTC cells may help with the early detection of cancer. Generally, the higher the CTC count, the higher the risk of cancer.

Researchers from the National Institute of Integrative Medicine (NIIM) used the cytology-based ISET-CTC Test plus PSA marker test to evaluate the risk of developing prostate cancer in a group of Australian men.

The research findings suggest that the combination of ISET-CTC testing and PSA marker testing has an estimated positive -predictive-value (PPV) of 99% and negative-predictive-value (NPV) of 97%. This means there is a greater certainty about diagnosis than the standard PSA blood test, which provides a PPV of approximately 25% and an NPV of 15.5%.

Prostate cancer is most common in men and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths (25%) in Australia. One in seven Australian men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer by the age of 85, with more than 3300 men dying each year. This number is rising, suggesting the need for a more reliable and accurate way to diagnose the disease.

Further reading:

https://www.hospitalhealth.com.au/content/clinical-services/news/test-improves-prostate-cancer-detection-1324228899?fbclid=IwAR3OWNVa-dW8gT1L6pi4n36igLq3EVSBw2ZAb65pqaV5AFiaww_vkzA-tlE#axzz6Pb2nShh2

COVID-19 Global Men’s Health update

Glen Poole

Australian Mens Health Forum

Global Action for Men’s Health (GAMH) have provided an international update on some of the links between coronavirus (COVID-19) and gender in their latest news bulletin.

Last month, GAMH reported evidence from China suggesting that mortality rates from COVID- 19 in men were almost twice as high as in women. The proportion of male deaths from the virus in Italy has been even higher: of the 827 deaths recorded by 11 March, 80% were male.

This pattern, if confirmed over a longer time period, would be consistent with what epidemiologists observed during the SARS and MERS outbreaks. In the 2003 SARS outbreak in Hong Kong, for instance, nearly 22% of infected men died, compared to around 13% of women. In an analysis of MERS infections between 2017 and 2018, around 32% of men died, and nearly 26% of women.

The mortality ‘gap’ could be caused by sex-based immunological or gendered differences, such as patterns and prevalence of smoking. The sex disparity also holds true in SARS -infected mice and it may be that the hormone oestrogen has a protective effect: removing the ovaries of infected female mice or blocking the oestrogen receptor makes the animals more likely to die compared to infected control mice.

Further reading:

Test improves prostate cancer detection

Tuesday, 16 June, 2020

Hospital Health

Australian researchers have found that a groundbreaking test can improve the early detection of prostate cancer.

Published in the open access journal Frontiers in Oncology , the research findings reveal that the ISET-Circulating Tumour Cells (CTC) Test can markedly improve detection of prostate cancer compared with the existing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test.

The ISET-CTC Test is used to identify abnormal cells circulating in the blood from any origin. Monitoring the presence of CTC cells may help with the early detection of cancer. Generally, the higher the CTC count, the higher the risk of cancer.

Researchers from the National Institute of Integrative Medicine (NIIM) used the cytology-based ISET-CTC Test plus PSA marker test to evaluate the risk of developing prostate cancer in a group of Australian men.

The research findings suggest that the combination of ISET-CTC testing and PSA marker testing has an estimated positive -predictive-value (PPV) of 99% and negative-predictive-value (NPV) of 97%. This means there is a greater certainty about diagnosis than the standard PSA blood test, which provides a PPV of approximately 25% and an NPV of 15.5%.

Prostate cancer is most common in men and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths (25%) in Australia. One in seven Australian men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer by the age of 85, with more than 3300 men dying each year. This number is rising, suggesting the need for a more reliable and accurate way to diagnose the disease.

Further reading:

https://www.hospitalhealth.com.au/content/clinical-services/news/test-improves-prostate-cancer-detection-1324228899?fbclid=IwAR3OWNVa-dW8gT1L6pi4n36igLq3EVSBw2ZAb65pqaV5AFiaww_vkzA-tlE#axzz6Pb2nShh2

COVID-19 Global Men’s Health update

Glen Poole

Australian Mens Health Forum

Global Action for Men’s Health (GAMH) have provided an international update on some of the links between coronavirus (COVID-19) and gender in their latest news bulletin.

Last month, GAMH reported evidence from China suggesting that mortality rates from COVID- 19 in men were almost twice as high as in women. The proportion of male deaths from the virus in Italy has been even higher: of the 827 deaths recorded by 11 March, 80% were male.

This pattern, if confirmed over a longer time period, would be consistent with what epidemiologists observed during the SARS and MERS outbreaks. In the 2003 SARS outbreak in Hong Kong, for instance, nearly 22% of infected men died, compared to around 13% of women. In an analysis of MERS infections between 2017 and 2018, around 32% of men died, and nearly 26% of women.

The mortality ‘gap’ could be caused by sex-based immunological or gendered differences, such as patterns and prevalence of smoking. The sex disparity also holds true in SARS -infected mice and it may be that the hormone oestrogen has a protective effect: removing the ovaries of infected female mice or blocking the oestrogen receptor makes the animals more likely to die compared to infected control mice.

Further reading:

FREE TENA Men Sampling Kits

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TENA – a supporter of PCFA.

Further information

https://www.tena.com.au/products/men/guards-range/free-tena-men-sampling-kits/

Phone:  1800 623 347

Core Strengthening Exercises at home

Only when you are not at home alone.  Seek medical advice on exercise first.